intro - schedule - projects - resources - classroom

How to Turn in Projects:

  1. Using your real name, register at OpenProcessing.org so we can easily find specific student project sketches.
  2. Instructions on how to create and upload project sketches here.
  3. Go to our classroom page and add your project sketch to the correct project category.
  4. For every project submission, include a sentence or two explaining what we're looking at and what you were trying to personally do in the project. If you did something above and beyond the requirements of the project, then mention what that is and how it went.
  5. Include a screenshot to serve as the thumbnail of each project sketch you submit. This will make browsing all the cool programs you make much easier for you and everybody else. The screenshot should just be of the active window, not the entire screen. For Windows you hold Alt+Print Screen then open Microsoft Paint or Photoshop and press Control+v or paste and save the image. For Mac you hold Command+Shift+4 and then press the Spacebar and the image will be saved to the desktop. Here is how you add it to your uploaded sketches:

How to add images to project sketches in processing

Project 1: Painting with Code

Due Monday, September 10th at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.


This project has 5 requirements:

  1. Create 2 different digital paintings (or sketches) using Processing.
  2. In each painting you must evoke the style and pattern of a different Modern painter, for example Mondrian, Miro, or Klee.
  3. Upload both sketches to the classroom page.
  4. In the description of each sketch explain which Modern painter inspired you for that sketch and how you were trying to evoke her/his work in your painting.
  5. Each painting must include at least 5 different 2D Primitives, such as ellipse or line. For a list of 2D Primitives see the top middle of the screen here: http://processing.org/reference/

Some ideas to go above and beyond the requirements and possibly earn an A for the project:

Project 2: Digital Avant-garde Portraits

Due Monday, September 17 at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

This project has 5 requirements:

  1. Partner up with anyone in class.
  2. Meet outside of class for at least 2 hours to work together and help one another.
  3. Create a large (size at least 800 by 800) portrait of them in Processing.
  4. Within the visual design of the portrait itself, emphasize and foreground the fact that the portrait was created with computer code. What is easy to do in Processing? What is Processing good at? Use the unique affordances of Processing and JavaScript to shape the style and look of the portrait. Refer to the lecture given on Monday on the avant-garde and affordances to help shape your approach to this project. Use all of the functions and tools at your disposal.
  5. Use at least 30 different colors (here's some code) in any way in the portrait.

Some ideas to go above and beyond the requirements and possibly earn an A for the project:

Project 3: Eye Fracking

Due Monday, September 24th at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

This project has 4 requirements:

  1. Create an animation in Processing that is either inspired by Glitch Art, Alternate Humor Art, or Psychedelic Art. As you create the project, try to play, experiment and riff on the chaos and accidents that occur in the process. Incorporate accidents that you do into the work itself. This is the project where you really explore the possibilities.
    • If you want to be inspired by Glitch Art, this video has a lot of good references:
    • If you want to be inspired by Alternative Humor Art, here are some references:
    • If you want to be inspired by Psychedelic Art here are some references:
  2. The animation of your project must go through 3 distinct phases. For example:
    • A "phase" could mean, for example, that the imagery could go from dark and cool colors to bright and warm colors, or from square and angular shapes to circular and blobby shapes.
    • A "phase" coulde mean that the images themselves are being swapped out, warping, smearing, or changing in some dramatic way.
  3. Use at least 10 different float variables.
  4. Use noStroke so you can build up blobby shapes out of simple 2D primitives.

Some ideas to go above and beyond the requirements and possibly earn an A for the project:

Project 4: Loopy Toons

Due Monday, October 1st at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

DO THE READING FOR THIS WEEK AND LAST WEEK IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!

 

This project has 5 requirements:

  1. You must create an animation that tells a funny story. Have fun! The story can be as wacky as you want.
  2. When you upload your animation to Processing, in 3-5 or more sentences describe (in the space provided next to your sketch) what you were trying to express and also include any instructions if your work is interactive.
  3. You have a choice as to how you will render the images:
    1. You may tell the story through procedurally drawn (primitive) shapes that depict characters and scene you create in processing. If you choose this route, you need to use at least 30 primitives and at least one of them must mutate shape.
    2. You may create, load and play images that form a simple animation. If you choose this route you need to use at least 10 images. The images you create could be simple drawings or photographs you make or take.
  4. You must use at least 10 iterative loops within the void draw function (or within any function you repeatedly call during run-time). The iterative loops can be any kind, such as a for loop, a while loop, an if loop, etc.
  5. There must be obvious changes happening in both the foreground (for example with a character) AND in the background (for example, with the sky).

Some ideas to go above and beyond the requirements and possibly earn an A for the project:

  1. Spend all your extra effort polishing the presentation of the story. Polishing the story is how you go above and beyond the basic expectations. You don't have to use any new technical tricks (besides the ones mentioned in the four requirements above) if you don't want to.

Project 5: Paint Toy

Due Monday, October 8th at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

DO THE READING FOR THIS WEEK AND LAST WEEK IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!

 

This project has 5 requirements:

  1. The toy must have one "brush" that is absolutely conventional. It could leave a trail of black, red, or any color over the background. It could be crisp (hard-edged) or fuzzy (soft-edged).
  2. The toy must have one "brush" that is somewhat experimental. It could leave animal tracks. It could smear eyeballs around the background. It could leave drips slide down the screen.
  3. The toy must have one "brush" that is absolutely experimental. Go nuts with this one. It could cause the entire screen to warp. It could suck up everything around the mouse and turn it into cheese. The brush could spray a fountain of zombie mice that scatter around the screen and eat holes into the computer monitor, exposing the wiring behind the plastic. Or, the screen could be pure black, and when the "brush" moved over the surface it scared bats that flew away from the mouse, revealing white peeking through where they were sitting.
  4. All of the three brushes must be functional in the same project sketch. For example, the user/player could click an icon to change the "brush". Or, they could type the keys, "1", "2", or "q", "w", etc., to change the "brush".
  5. You must include specific and clear instructions on the Open Processing page on how to use the toy. And you must include a description of what you were trying to accomplish creatively with the piece.

Note:

  • You do NOT have to have an erase function in the paint toy (the user/player can restart the sketch to have a fresh screen) unless you want to add one.
  • Spend all your extra effort polishing the paint toy. Polishing the toy is how you go above and beyond the basic expectations. You don't have to use any new technical tricks (besides the ones mentioned in the requirements above) if you don't want to.

Project 6: Microgames

Due Monday, October 22nd at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

DO THE READING FOR THIS WEEK AND LAST WEEK IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!

 

This project has 5 requirements:

  1. The game must be winnable within 10 seconds. Do not make a longer game.
  2. When the player does something RIGHT, there is a strong visual reward.
  3. When the player does something WRONG, there is specific strong visual feedback. For example, the screen flashes red for a second, or their avatar turns into a pig, etc.
  4. The game must have 2 very different challenges that occur at the same time. For example:
    • AVOID running boars while trying to COLLECT bacon chunks that fall off them.
    • Completely SHAVE a sleeping man's face while trying NOT TO WAKE him.
    • FLY THROUGH a crowd of minds while DROPPING ideas into them.
  5. The game must have a background image that helps set the mood of the game. It should add to the theme. For example, if your game occurs in space, you could use a star field.

Notes:

  • You can use keyboard input, mouse input, or both keyboard and mouse for input.
  • You do not have to use sound, but if you want to, I put some examples on the Open Processing classroom page.
  • You do not have to have a score, but it you want to have a score, I put some examples on the Open Processing classroom page.
  • You do not need a restart button.
  • Spend all your extra effort polishing your Microgame!

Project 7: Braitenberg Vehicles

Due Monday, October 29th at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

DO THE READING FOR THIS WEEK AND LAST WEEK IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!

 

If you want to completely scrap the 6 requirements below because you have a really cool idea to make artifical life or stuff move onscreen, just ask the instructor and we'll figure something out!

 

Otherwise, this project has 6 requirements:

  1. You must have 3 kinds of creatures moving on screen. For example: cats, birds, and bees. You may have 1 of each, or 100 of each, the number of each kind of creature is up to you.
  2. They can't move off screen. They have to stay inside the sketch space somehow.
  3. One kind of creature must be attracted to another kind of creature. For example, cats are attracted to bees and chase them.
  4. One kind of creature must be scared of another kind of creature. For example, birds are scared of cats and run away from them.
  5. You must use randomness so that every time the program runs it unfolds differently. For example:
    • the number of bees varies from 1-30
    • the speed of the bees varies from super fast to painfully slow
    • the position at which the bees originally spawns changes
  6. You must use a background image that helps set the tone and amplify the theme. For example, if the creatures were cats, birds, and bees, a nice flowery prarie could work well.

Notes:

  • I uploaded an example project in which a white ellipse is scared of a red ellipse and a green ellipse. Give proper attribution if you use this or any other example project to remix and make your own: http://www.openprocessing.org/sketch/76219
  • Spend all your extra effort polishing your Braitenberg Vehicles!

Project 8: Self-Portrait Poetry

Due Monday, November 5th at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

DO THE READING FOR THIS WEEK AND LAST WEEK IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!

 

This project has 4 requirements

  1. Identify an OUTER ASPECT of yourself. Reflect on how you think other people see you. Do people think you are bubbly and fun? Do they think you are brooding and dark? Or, perhaps you think people only see the surface. Perhaps they only see your looks or your race, or the fact you dress like a nerd.
  2. Identify an INNER ASPECT of yourself. Reflect on how you see yourself. What is something you know about yourself that contradicts your OUTER ASPECT? For example, if people only see a handsome or pretty face (OUTER ASPECT) but you consider yourself a rather smart person (INNER ASPECT), those would work well together for this project.
  3. Represent your two aspects in dynamic TENSION. One aspect must be dominant at one point and the other must be dominant at another point. For example, a Barbie or Ken doll is just sitting there blinking onscreen and suddently a big brain bursts out of the face and starts spraying computer code and math equations all over the screen.
  4. You must use CONCRETE poetry at some point in the project. This means that the shape and/or movement of the text adds meaning to the self-portrait. Think about composition, scale, rotation, transparency, repetition, etc., of the text. Leverage the visual aspect of text.

Notes:

  • Spend all your extra effort polishing your self-portrait.

Project 9: Toy Jam!

Due Monday, November 12th at 10am

 

If you have problems programming this project go here first.

 

This project is connected to the final project. This project is the foundation of your final project, which will be a 20 second game. For this project you will design and program the main thing that the player controls in the final game project. Don't worry about enemies for now. Don't worry about any environment. Concentrate on making a FUN TOY that the player tinkers around with. Be creative. If you want to develop cool and innovative games in the future, you need to start thinking outside the box TODAY. So push yourself on this one.

 

This project has 4 requirements:

  1. Pick one concept and feeling from a list of five adjectives:
    • Sinister
    • Seductive
    • Clumsy
    • Timid
    • Playful
  2. Program a character, body part, creature, or machine that evokes that concept that you chose above. It can embody that concept by the way it wiggles, wags, leaps, divides, converges, etc. You do not have to be so conservative with your toy. Have fun with it. Your toy could be jello that wiggles, a tail that wags, a flag that flaps, etc. If you want to be less creative and just make an avatar that runs and jumps or a ship that turns and flies, that's fine as well, but you still need to evoke one of the concepts above in your toy.
  3. The toy must rely on player input to motivate it. It can be keyboard or mouse input.
  4. Brainstorm ideas for how you will add two more elements to develop this toy into a game. Those elements can be environmental hazards, enemies that attack the player, or whatever else you can think of that will build on your toy. List and explain these ideas in the comments on Open Processing.

Notes:

  • Note that this is not a full game yet. Focus all your attention on making your game creature, character, or machine fun to play with. You are making a TOY here, not a game. Spend all your extra effort polishing your toy.

Project 10: Game Jam!

THIS IS A HARD DEADLINE. Projects turned on late will not count.

Due Monday, November 19th at 10am

 

For the final project you are developing another microgame. It can be any kind of microgame you want. Create a game that you actually really want to play. Create a game that you will still be proud of in a few years. What is something you've been wanting to try out as a creative programmer and designer? Now is your chance.

 

This project has 5 requirements:

  1. The game must be winnable within 20 seconds. Do not make a longer game.
  2. The game must build on the toy you made for the previous project.
  3. When the player does something RIGHT, there is a strong visual reward.
  4. When the player does something WRONG, there is specific strong visual feedback. For example, the screen flashes red for a second, or their avatar turns into a pig, etc.
  5. HAVE FUN and USE THE SKYPE HELP CHANNEL and TUTORING LAB!!!

Notes:

  • Focus all your attention on making your game as juicy and fun as possible. DON'T HOLD BACK! Show what you've got with this project. This game is worth double in terms of its impact on your final grade, so do your very best. Start working on it TODAY and work CONSISTENTLY every day until you are finished. Do not wait until the last minute to complete your game. There will be bugs and other unforeseen challenges. Plan ahead for there to be problems and have a "cushion" of time to solve them.

 

 

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